Monet, Take 3.

I have a plan for the homeschool class. I am introducing them to Impressionism this Thursday, followed by post-Impressionism the next week in the form mostly of Van Gogh and Gaugin, followed the next week by contemporary abstract/Pop Artist Rodrigue. See the progression? So anyway, I intend to study Monet’s series of paintings of the bridge at Giverny with a guided observation. But how to help them create their own Japanese bridge over a pond?

Monet Model, Take 1: this was a soft pastel impression on green construction paper. I decided the green paper was too light and the soft pastels too advanced for this class in this application. I didn’t even keep the model.

Monet Model, Take 2: this is an oil pastel impression on darker green construction paper. It was ok, and I was going with it at first. This would have required the students to draw the bridge reflection. It also set up two oil pastel studies back-to-back, as next week will be a study of Starry Night in oil pastel. Needless to say, I was dissatisfied.

oil pastel bridge

Monet Model, Take 3: Then I saw painted Monet bridges, either on a blog or Artsonia (anyone help me credit the source? I can’t find it!) I realized this would work much better for my situation! The reflection is an imprint by fold. The whole thing is different enough that the Van Gogh project won’t feel at all repetitive! Adjustments for the homechoolers will include a half-sheet paper, because this just required too much patience of them, and I want to get a good brown tempera for the bridge, for more contrast.

tempera monet bridge

Also Thursday, Faith Lutheran Kindergarten will be practicing line and pattern and cutting on curves with this spiral snake, which has been hanging from my dining room light for at least a week, and their 1st and 2nd will finish their baby penguins, and possibly make some adult penguins. I added an Adele penguin to my portfolio.

Sssss...

penguin with egg

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Filed under Art, First/Second Grade, Kindergarten, Teaching

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