Sometimes Experiments Fail

But it’s the experience that matters, I remind myself. I am always telling my students (and their parents) that what we learn in experiencing art is as important as the product, if not more so. I hope so here, as I don’t think much of the product this time.

It all began with a striking photo I saw on a “flyfishing in Ireland” website. It was a river tumbling down a bit of a cascade with gray rocky outcrops and green and yellow moss and shrubs. The water in the photo was almost entirely white with the flow; it looked almost ethereal.I’ve done paintings with flowing water before, to good effect, using white ink.

A non-experimental study for a painting I did for a friend.

A non-experimental study for a painting I did for a friend. Even as just a study, better than the new one.

And then I wondered, with the yellow in the plants and moss, what if the stones had more purple? So I undertook an experiment, trying to add more drama with the high contrast. And then I found that I, apparently, didn’t bring my ink. I have watercolor; I have acrylic. No ink. Could I make it work with what I have?

Not working, for so many reasons.

Not working, for so many reasons.

Well…I am going to say “no.” It’s interesting, but no, it is not what I was looking for. The actual river in Cork is much more compelling. I might try again, returning to the gray stone, once I return to the States and find my white ink. But oh well.

By the way, the photos are with a new camera my sweetie bought me. No shadow marks and spots! Thank you, Love!

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2 Comments

Filed under Art

2 responses to “Sometimes Experiments Fail

  1. kendi

    The first one looks very much like the painting you did for me! Did you do another? It’s still a favorite of mine.

    • 4pam

      Hi Kendi!! Nice to see you in my comments! It is the little-bit-bigger than hand-sized study I did for your painting. Note the scribbled verses all around, working out the best placement. 🙂 I am really glad you are enjoying it.

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