Paris: the Day of the Musee D’Orsay

The next day was a Sunday, and found Theo still sick, and he seemed to be getting a cough. But our museum passes were all pre-purchased, and Theo still had hopes of seeing the beaches of Normandy Monday, so we decided to see if he would improve. We left him to his internet and manga and headed back to Paris, Myriah to the international service at the Cathedral du Notre Dame, and Stoney and I to Sainte-Chapelle, apparently once a royal chapel, and an amazing collection of stained glass.

The chapel is under renovation, it’s third one, I believe.

The chapel isn't far from Notre Dame, and the is the smallest church we have visited.

The chapel isn’t far from Notre Dame, and is the smallest church we have visited.

The difference between restored windows and yet-to-be-restored is clear. These are dirty.

The difference between restored windows and yet-to-be-restored is clear. These are dirty.

The restoration process is extensive and painstaking. They remove panels and take them apart, cleaning each piece, replacing the leading, before putting the puzzle back together. It must take FOREVER.

The restoration process is extensive and painstaking. They remove panels and take them apart, cleaning each piece, replacing the leading, before putting the puzzle back together. It must take FOREVER.

See some of the results, and our visit to the MO, by clicking here.

The result is stunning! The church has more stained glass than solid wall, so it really is incredible.

The result is stunning! The church has more stained glass than solid wall, so it really is incredible.

Magnificent!

Magnificent!

Other parts are getting spruced up, too.

Other parts are getting spruced up, too.

Clearly of royal origins.

Clearly of royal origins.

After this enchanting beginning to the morning, we moved on to the Musee D’Orsay. The D’Orsay was a very different experience than the Louvre! It is mostly focused on the period of and around the Impressionists, in a beautiful old train station. The museum is perfectly lit for the artwork, and there is an abundance of seating everywhere you go. Every piece I saw was exquisite. I could LIVE in Musee D’Orsay. After growing weary seeing 80% of the museum, had I had enough energy, I would have started over and seen the whole thing again. Unfortunately, there was a strict no photos policy. I only snuck a few.

Stoney approaching the museum.

Stoney approaching the museum.

We had pass privileges with this museum, just as we did with the others, but here, it wasn't as helpful. This is the line for PASS entry extending behind us.

We had pass privileges with this museum, just as we did with the others, but here, it wasn’t as helpful. This is the line for PASS entry extending behind us.

And here is what we waited behind. This was undoubtedly our longest wait by far. I can't imagine purchasing tickets could have been much longer.

And here is what we waited behind. This was undoubtedly our longest wait by far. I can’t imagine purchasing tickets could have been much longer.

The outer plaza was replete with statuary to occupy the weary waiting.

The outer plaza was replete with statuary to occupy the weary waiting.

The main gallery was beautiful, surrounded by several levels of smaller galleries.

The main gallery was beautiful, surrounded by several levels of smaller galleries.

It was originally a train station.

It was originally a train station.

Even in this sneaky shot my husband took, you can tell the lighting is impeccable!

Even in this sneaky shot my husband took, you can tell the lighting is impeccable!

We returned to Theo in the late afternoon, to find that he had now developed a fever, and the cough had worsened. We decided he would have to see Normandy some other time, and Myriah would just have to miss it. First thing next morning we checked out and began the 6 hour trip home. We did pop into Limoges for lunch and a break, but Theo enjoyed his own bed that night, and a visit to the doctor next morning.

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