Tag Archives: sculpture

Sightseeing in Florence

One major question a visit to Florence raises: WHERE did all this marble come from?! And who knew it came in so many colors?

My primary sightseeing destination was the Piazza del Duomo and further on, the Renaissance art mecca, the Gallery Uffizi. While you can’t take photos inside the Gallery, I did get my obligatory “Pam outside another art museum” photo for my collection. (By the way, the virtual tour online is excellent.)

Another notch in my belt...the Uffizi.

Another notch in my belt…the Uffizi.

Florence is definitely done up fancy, almost everywhere you go. We had reserved tickets online to avoid waiting in a line at the door. We, in fact, got in a little early for our reservations because it just wasn’t that busy. A tour group had gone in the reservations door a little before us, and we only walked past 15 or so people to go in. I am sure it is much worse when it isn’t shortly after opening on a Sunday in spring. Anyway, the ticket office to exchange our vouchers for tickets was across the street, and quite beautiful, too, if you look up.

ALWAYS look up in Florence.

ALWAYS look up in Florence.

This is the piazza (I think) that housed the fountain of Neptune, which I actually liked. I just don’t know if it was the real thing or a copy, because this has an area, some covered, some not, with copies of many of the most famous sculptures in the Uffizi. The copies are for everyone to see and learn from for free, with no concern for pigeons or other vandals.

Part of the Neptune fountain. I think the green is a color change wrought by the water, but I suppose it could be the color of the marble?

Part of the Neptune fountain. I think the green is a color change wrought by the water, but I suppose it could be the color of the marble? Or maybe just those parts are bronze?

Tourists hanging out around the statue replicas, most of which include plaques explaining their origin.

Tourists hanging out around the statue replicas, most of which include plaques explaining their origin.

This is also a prime spot for catching a tour carriage, or being hit up by any number of street hustlers with fake goods, right outside the Gucci Museum.

The Uffizi is to your left, down that street. Note how quiet the piazza is on a Sunday early afternoon. It won't stay that way.

The Uffizi is to your left, down that street. Note how quiet the piazza is on a Sunday early afternoon. It won’t stay that way.

of Florence and the Duomo here

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Sculpture in Barcelona

As you may have guessed from the scenes I’ve shown you already, there is a lot of sculpture in Barcelona. I guess they’ve been collecting it for a really long time.

Probably the most famous  sculpture in Barcelona, Columbus pointing the way to New World, except...not exactly.

Probably the most famous sculpture in Barcelona, Columbus pointing the way to New World, except…not exactly.

He looks soo....confused.

He looks soo….confused.

They have newer forms, too…

The cutest man in the moon ever!

The cutest man in the moon ever!

Barc.fountain

Barc.knight

Barc.lions

Barc.statshepherd

Barc.statue2

This is only a fraction of what the city holds. If I lived here, I would find a sculpture every day and just study it, ponder it. There are enough to last me quite awhile.

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I just LOVE sharing!

At least, I love sharing art. I took the 3rd through 7th grades on a field trip today. We visited some of the massive outdoor sculpture collection at Wichita State University. http://webs.wichita.edu/?u=mark2&p=/kranae/ This collection was named by Public Art Review as one of the top 10 campus collections in the nation, and I sent out 24 students with scavenger hunts to find out more about 10-11 pieces, depending on the grade level. I think this went over very well! The kids enjoyed it, but we will have to see how much they actually learned about form and sculpture in our upcoming ceramics unit.

And also, you really can’t go to any art venue without passing by some nudes. None were on the hunt; we focused on none, and I attempted to route them around most of them. Still, it’s apparent some students noted them anyway. It remains to be seen how much this will upset parents. There was truly nothing provocative anywhere that the kids were sent. *sigh*

A special bonus: the museum was showcasing it’s current and temporary possession of an original Picasso. I took the older kids in small groups to see it, because how often in life can you view, within a couple of feet, an ORIGINAL PICASSO? And this one was HUGE. I am thinking it must have been at least 6 feet tall. Or more. I didn’t note the dimensions. It was a portrait of his second wife, his daughter, and his new step-daughter not long after his wedding. the sheer expanse of canvas awed me, knowing I would absolutely quake before that much white! Yet I delight in painting and experimenting small-scale. My heart beats faster at the mere thought of such huge sweeps of the arm!

I’m glad I did this.

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Filed under Art, Fifth/Sixth Grade, Seventh/Eighth Grade, Teaching, Third/Fourth Grade